A Picture is Worth a 1000 Words: PLAGIARISM INFOGRAPHICS

I received an email last night from a teacher who is worried not only about the frequent cases of plagiarism in her classes but at the fact that the students don’t seem to understand they have done anything wrong.

I agree. This is an issue. Although I have spoken to the grade 7 and 8s about Plagiarism it most definitely is not enough. The students should be reminded of what exactly constitutes plagiarism, and tips on how to avoid it whenever they receive an assignment that requires research.

I did a quick search and found some amazing infographics to help teachers get the point across. I will being with my very first (and rudimentary) one called You are a Plagiairist If:

Screen Shot 2014-03-28 at 11.48.39 AM

But, I admit, the design leaves much to be desired. Here are some more professional-looking and fun visuals about plagiarism.

This is my favourite. Clear, concise, simple:

easybib

This one is fun, but takes a bit of looking at. I would introduce it and take a part of a class to talk about it. Then I would post it where you can point to it anytime you have a research assignment.plagiarism+infographic+2+copy

 

Umm, this one is a little dramatic, but it gets the point across…

plagtracker-dark-and-light-side-infographic

The following needs to be accompanies by the website where I found kit, the WriteCheck blog. They take a study that used over 900 teachers in secondary and post-secondary to define the types of plagiarism and then gave these types social media names to show what role the internet plays in plagiarism. It is well done and offers an easy way to talk to students about it. Although I recommend checking out the website, here is the very large infographic:

spectrum_report

I would also like to mention how I like these infographics as the sources are included right in the mirage. Saves time, don’t you think? You could also use the resources Madame Prof de Français showed us in today’s workshop and make your own:

I made my infographic using Easel.ly

 

 

 

 

 

 

Socratic Seminar and The Backchannel

These days, when I check my RSS feeds and blog, I have to really sift among the articles that begin with “10 apps…” or another info graphic. So when I cam across this brilliant lesson plan I was truly inspired.

This teacher maximizes both the physical space and the virtual to set up an engaged and rich discussion among her students. The socratic seminar method establishes the rules of the discussion in the fish bowl while the back channel allows the quieter students who comprise the actual bowl to have their say.(Have no idea what I’m talking about? Check out the wonderful video included in the post). The screenshots of the discussion as well as the video Tolisano includes show an amazingly thoughtful discussion.

This method could be used for discussing literature, but also for discussions on issues in ERC or Contemporary world.

A simple, elegant lesson plan that seamlessly integrates technology in order to enhance student learning!

See on Scoop.itipadyoupad

Humanities teacher, Shannon Hancock, at Graded, the American School of São Paulo, read and worked through The Alchemist by Paulo Coehlo with her 8th grade students. Not only did they read the text,…

See on langwitches.org

The Myth Of Digital Citizenship And Why We Need To Teach It Anyway | EdReach

Here are two articles about digital citizenship- the first highlights a growing (and scary) issue: students cyberbullying teachers.
The second (below) simply confirms our approach to social media- basically we expect students to behave online the way we expect them tp behave offline: with respect, kindness and courtesy.

See on Scoop.itipadyoupad

At one time in the not so distant past there were no cell phones. And then everything changed at a rate faster than the speed of amending a student handbook. I can distinctly remember the first time one of my 8th grade students brought a cell phone to school. It really wasn’t that big of a deal, more of a novelty really. I mean one student with a cell phone had next to no bearing on our day to day school operations. But then a second student brought a cell phone.

See on edreach.us

rAPPido Review: Showbie a Way to make a More Efficient Workflow

With the advent of the iPad and more and more homework assignments getting submitted electronically, many teachers find themselves with overstuffed inboxes and drowning in word docs and presentations.

However, where there is a need, there’s a market! More and more tools are appearing on the market everyday in order to help out. Thanks Nadia (Miss Science/Math teacher) for letting me know about Showbie. Like Nearpod, the subscription fee is a tad prohibitive ($10/month) but the free version still gives you lots of options.

Here is a video giving you a quick summary of how it works:

Here is what Nadia said about it:

I found this app yesterday and have been playing around with it since. I think it would be really useful for teachers tying to go paper free.
It can be used really easily with note taking apps too like goodnotes or notability. or even keynote or something else.
So I thought I would give it a try.
Signing up was easy:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.22.47 AM
You add your name and password and then get started right away by adding a class.
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.23.43 AM
When you are adding your assignment, you can add a description and a due date:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.24.39 AM
Then it is time to invite students!
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.25.11 AM
Here is how it looks like on your teacher dashboard:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.30.51 AM
ON THE STUDENT SIDE:
First they have to download the app and sign in as a student. They will asked to give a username and password, but won’t have to put in an email.
They enter the code for the class:
photo 3
Then find the work they want to submit and choose to open it in Showbie:
photo 1
They choose to add file to the assignment folder:
photo 4AND BACK TO TEACHER VIEW:
And voilà! Here it is in my teacher folder!
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.31.03 AM
You can choose to add noters to the assignment folder:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.32.40 AM
As well as many other things:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.52.03 AM
Then I thought I would try annotating it in Notability, just to see if it would work with Showbie:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.35.17 AM
Though it worked, I am not sure if you would be able to submit feedback like this to individual students. The way it looked in my folder was like a whole new document. Perhaps Nadia can tell us how she does it?
The paid version allows you to annotate the documents in Showbie, which I assume would sink with the student’s account so that they could see your marks.
And then, of course, you can add more classes:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.36.39 AM
Here is what the free version gives you:
Screen Shot 2014-04-24 at 10.56.03 AM
Obviously, the paid version gives you way more- to check out the difference between paid and free, click here.

Earth Day 2014: Top 11 Eco-Friendly Apps That Could Help You Save The World

Well, maybe not save the world, but definitely be a better, more aware consumer…

Check the apps out- most are free and all are chock full of useful information.

See on Scoop.itipadyoupad

Earth Day 2014 is tomorrow Tuesday, April 22. The annual international event is a good time to reinforce our green habits and these apps will help you make more environmentally friendly decisions every day.

See on www.idigitaltimes.com