rAPPido Review: Kaizena — A feedback app for teachers

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 10.51.26 AMThis morning I spent some time with the app Kaizena. First – Shout out to Ms. Jackson for having sent me the link so long ago. Although it might take me some time, I do always check it out!

NOTE: Kaizena is a web-based application, not an app that you will get on the app store. I tried out the teacher version on my laptop and the student version on the iPad. All functions seemed to work except for a few things, but more on that later.

In order to not re-invent the wheel, I would highly recommend watching the following introductory video, showing you how to use Kaizena. When I signed up, I bumbled around, wondering where to go. Watching the video made it very clear how to proceed even trying it out.

Warning: the Kaizena peeps don’t hold to our 5 minute max, flipped classroom video rule. The whole thing runs at 24 minutes. However, it is well worth it as I think this application could be very useful!

In a Nutshell:

Kaizena lets you give feedback in a variety of formats on students work. When you highlight certain passages you want to comment on you can:

  • add audio comments
  • send a link to a flipped classroom video you have created or that you have found on youtube
  • embed one of Kaizena’s curated lessons (eg. say a student keeps on misusing an apostrophe. Simply tap the lessons icon, type in apostrophe and the lesson will pop up. Watch the video for more info).
  • Of course you can also add text comments as well!

This is done by starting a conversation with your student. Each student has their own conversation and all the feedback you have ever given them will remain in that conversation.

Again. Watch the video.

Kaizena works with google drive and google classroom, so you sign in with Google:

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Our school was already listed! How cool is that?

Wait a minute…Is somebody already using Kaizena? If so, let me know!

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Then you set up your profile and your groups. And by groups, they mean classes.

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If you are using Google classroom, you can import your classes. If not, you can simply send a link and invite your students to join.

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Once they join, they should pick one of your classes. That way you have all your students in nice, manageable groups. Then they will send you a file. In order to test this out, I signed up to Kaizena with my personal gmail, so the screenshots are a little confusing because Lina Gordaneer is the teacher and Lina E. Gordaneer is the student. But aren’t we all both teacher and student? Aren’t we, I ask?

Ok. Moving on.

So this is how the teacher’s view looks like before students:

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Then I tried to add some lessons, so I added the link to my press I use for the Mindful Use workshop. Which worked fine! It totally embedded my prezi!

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But then I tried to add an audio comment and got this:

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And I couldn’t find what they meant by “on top”. And I couldn’t leave the screen. Very frustrating. But then I realized when I looked in the help sheet that there was supposed to be a pop-up by the URL. But Safari didn’t like pop-ups. As soon as I switched to Firefox it worked fine.

Here is how it looks from a student’s perspective on the iPad:

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All they have to do is tap the add file:

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They can easily add a file:

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It automatically takes them to their Google drive. I found this a little hard as the folders didn’t seem to work. But you could use the search tab. It worked okay.

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However, it didn’t allow me to open the file…Not sure why – file format? Temporary glitch? I  will try again…Nope. I tried documents from dropbox and a photo from photos and neither of them could upload, however I was using Safari on the iPad. Perhaps that is the problem? Let me try to log in with Chrome…

Ok. Crashed my iPad. This is not good…

Nope. Doesn’t work on Chrome. So only files in Google Drive can be accessed on the iPad…

However, opening something from Google drive was a cinch:

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Now back to the teacher’s view:

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I just have to tap on Lina to see the file she uploaded and start commenting!

I added a lesson, an audio comment and a text comment:

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You can see that as the teacher comments, it automatically appears on the student’s page as well:

Screen Shot 2015-10-21 at 10.36.36 AMAll in all, a very useful tool  if you are using google drive with your students.

If you decide to try it out, please let me know about it!

How to Use The Now Habit to End Student Procrastination | Edudemic

Wow. I click on these articles, looking for something to share but really only expect to see the same old ideas recycled again and again. And then I read on and am totally shocked to read about some good tips. In these dark days of winter, when the routine feels like yet another heavy layer of drudgery, I am totally going to sue the “Unschedule” idea. (You must read on to know what this!)

I also like the second regarding managing worry. I know I do this unconsciously- ask myself what is the worst that can happen and then figure out how to deal with that worst case scenario. But I like the idea of having it written down.

The Now Habit is a book by Neil Fiore PhD, who is a licensed psychologist, which explores a topic that teachers are far too familiar with: procrastination.

Source: www.edudemic.com

See on Scoop.itipadyoupad

7 Ways to Deal With Digital Distractions in the Classroom | Edudemic

I have become weary of any articles that begin with [insert number] ways you can [insert topic], but the article below makes some good suggestions. The two that stand out for me is taking bait of time in class to bust the myth of multitasking. This would be especially  useful with students who feel they work best when doing many things. The article gives a great, easy little test to cure them of that particular delusion.

As well, the author makes a good point about reading online and how you format your text. Check it out!

Source: www.edudemic.com

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Paperless Classroom does not mean no paper?

I think I have been thinking about the paperless classroom all wrong. In my head, I envisioned a class where everything was done on the computer, no pencil and notebook in sight. And though I felt like this was the line I had to tow, as a promoter of technology in the classroom and someone who is acutely aware of the amount of paper waste that happens in my library, I never felt very comfortable with the idea.

Why?

I guess because for something to enter my brain, I need to take the time to write it down. Then I need to make arrows that lead to following ideas. Then I have to circle things and make more arrows and then write notes in the margin.

My day to day management also requires paper. Every week I begin with writing a list on graph paper. I keep it by my computer and when I get distracted I take my eyes away from the screen and look at my list. Just the fact of writing it down by hand means that I will remember I have to do it – the looking at the list is only secondary.

The results of this study by the Association for Psychological Science, which shows that writing notes by hand is better for long-term comprehension, as well as the article below about the benefits of doodling, demonstrates that I am not the only one who finds taking notes beneficial.

Then it occurred to me that I was getting the wrong idea – the paperless classroom does not mean no paper. It doesn’t mean that students should not take notes in whatever way they feel is more advantageous to them.

I have to take off my literal hat and think of it more as a workflow idea. That is, the teacher gives the assignment electronically (via email, Showbie, dropbox, google drive). The student completes their assignment, sending the finished project via the chosen method. The student is not burdened with a whole bunch of loose papers, and the teacher can choose an efficient, electronic way of receiving their submissions. Simple. Elegant. Still allows for the diversity of styles and preferences.

Sometimes I am slow on the uptake…

Check out the article about the benefits of doodling below!

Source: www.edudemic.com

See on Scoop.itipadyoupad

11 Useful Tips for Managing iPads in the Classroom

I feel pretty good right now. Taking a look at my hero Lisa Johnson’s recommendations for managing your iPad classroom, I feel like we are doing pretty well. However there is always room for improvement. I like her suggestions for visual cues, guidelines and student roles.

Check it out!

» 11 Useful Tips for Managing iPads in the Classroom |

Source: www.techchef4u.com

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Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This… Then…

This is an excellent resource that gives you a clear and concise guide to how to approach using content found on the web. As always Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano from the Langwitches blog serves up a thoughtful, well-designed resource – I am definitely adding this to the copyright section of my Digital Citizenship Toolkit!

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It is the responsibility of all educators to model good digital citizenship for their students. Especially when it comes to copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property. The waters are murky. No…

See on langwitches.org

Why you should never give students your phone number

I just finished a first draft of a social media policy for our staff- one of the points was to never give your personal information (address, phone number, etc.) to students or their parents.

Let’s just say that the texts in this post make a better (and way more hilarious) case than I could ever make…

Here is just one sample:

image from weareteachers.com

image from weareteachers.com

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Humor, infographics, printables, and inspiration for every educator.

See on www.weareteachers.com

You Are Not a Digital Native: Privacy in the Age of the Internet | Tor.com

I wanted to share this article by Cory Doctorow as I think it makes some extremely salient points when talking about kids and privacy. He also quotes Danah Boyd’s new book entitled It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked teens, a book that is on my shelf, waiting patiently for me to get to it.

But here are some of the big points Doctorow makes that A) I haven’t heard before and B) now seem so obvious I can’t believe I didn’t think about it  in that way before:

  • Just because kids’ make mistakes (which BTdubs, is how we all learn) with their privacy online, doesn’t mean they don’t care about it.
  • That because kids’ make mistakes with their privacy, the companies take that to mean that they don’t care about it, which means they can play fast and loose with their data.
  • Actually, kids care a lot about their privacy. Just ask any parent who wants to know what they did at their friend’s house last night. You can’t get more cryptic than the ubiquitous, “stuff.”

Ande here’s a quote just to whet your appetite:

 ” Kids intuitively know what privacy is worth, but being kids, they get some of the details wrong. It takes a long time to learn how to do privacy well, because there’s a big gap between giving up your privacy and getting bitten in the butt by that disclosure. It’s like obesity, or smoking—anything where the action and consequences are widely separated is going to be something that people have a hard time learning about. If every forkful of cheesecake immediately turned into a roll of fat, it would be a lot easier to figure out how much cheesecake was too much.

 

So kids spend a lot of time thinking about being private from parents, teachers and bullies, but totally overestimate how private they’ll be from future employers, their government, and police. And alas, by the time they figure it out, it’s too late.” Cory Doctorow

 

He goes on to mention ways kids are guarding their privacy and ways in which we too, us curmudgeonly digital immigrants, can also protect our privacy.

In my opinion, this is a must read.

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Cory Doctorow discusses the importance of Internet privacy, and how companies profit from our mistakes.

See on www.tor.com

Agenda Survey: Part 7 (Grade 11)

It is almost not worth talking about the data from the Grade 11s as only 11 students responded, but just for the sake of consistency, here are the salient points:

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As I mentioned above, the sample is too small to come to any conclusions, so I am going to refrain from coin so, though I am left with many many questions…

In Conclusion

Based on the variety of responses, I think sticking with our original plan, whereby we encourage the use of the built-in tools as a default, then make suggestions for a tool more suited to the student’s needs (do they need extra help with their organizational skills? Would a print agenda work better? A more specific agenda app?) as we go along is the best.

 

Agenda Survey: Part 6 (Grade 10)

And here are the results for Grade 10! There were many more students in Grade ten who do not use an agenda ever.  Just to give you an overview, here are the results by grade for  those who said they do NOT use an agenda:

Grade 7: 0%

Grade 8: 12%

Grade 9: 22%

Grade 10: 30%

Some of the comments that accompanied the “No” answer ranged from “I always forget it” to “I’m organized without one” , “I check the portal”. One respondent also declared it was a waste of paper as opposed to another respondent who said she didn’t use one this year but was planning on doing it next year.

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Once again, we must keep in mind that the older grades all receive the print agenda from the school. Thus, what is significant is not so much the number who use it, but the number of students who don’t. 1/3 of the respondents don’t use one at all. of the other two thirds,less than half rely solely on the print agenda.

 

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Although it seems that those who do use the print agenda seem pretty happy with it, as do those who use a combination of the two.

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