The Plagiarism Plague: A presentation using NearPod

Screen Shot 2014-02-25 at 12.37.15 PMYesterday I gave a presentation to the Grade 7s about plagiarism. It was meant as an introduction – what exactly is Plagiarism? What are the consequences? What is the best way to avoid accidental plagiarism?

I focused on talking about  the different ways you can accidentally plagiarize and suggested that summarizing or paraphrasing the information instead of copy and pasting it into their projects would go a long way in avoiding cheating. Once again, I want to repeat: this was meant only as an introduction! There are so many other things I want to tell them (how to evaluate a source, how to cite your sources, etc) but at least this is a good start.

I used this opportunity to try out Nearpod, an app that claims to be an” all in one mobile solution for teachers” and which I reviewed recently.

Although near pod allows you to create slides in the app itself, they only give you one template. But they do allow you to import slides from power points, PDFs, image files. So first of all, I made a simple powerpoint presentation and then uploaded these to Nearpod.

 

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LESSON LEARNED: I spent a lot of time deleting and re-importing my powerpoint slides. Either I found a mistake, decided I wanted to add a slide, changed my mind about layout. Every time one of the slides changed, I had to delete the previous slides and re-import the new ones. Each slide has to be deleted individually and sometimes the Nearpod site was very slow so this was very time-consuming.

BEST PRACTICE: I would suggest mapping out your presentation before even uploading to Nearpod. Make sure your slides are the best they can be, has everything on them, etc, before uploading.

Why not just use a powerpoint presentation you ask? Well, it is because of the interactive nature of Nearpod. When the students join your session, they see your presentation and you control their screens, in that they can’t rush ahead. When you swipe to another slide, the presentations on their iPad changes too. I wanted to try out this interactive feature- give them formative assessments, try out the drawing tool.

But I get ahead of myself…

Once the students join the session (You see the session code at the top left corner of the screenshots) they are asked to identify themselves:

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When I asked them if they knew what Plagiarism is, I was surprised by how many students had no idea what it was. In the future, I would put my definition slide before I gave the following quiz:

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I asked them a series of 9 questions, all true or false. It is plagiarism…

  1. If you copy a few sentences without adding quotation marks
  2. If you copy a few sentences without citing your source
  3. If you take someone else’s ideas without citing where you took the ideas from
  4. If you copy and paste information into a project
  5. If you write you opinion about someone else’s ideas
  6. If you copy someone else’s homework
  7. If you change a few words from text you copy and pasted
  8. You download an image licensed under the creative commons
  9. You do not cite your source for the image you downloaded

Here is what I saw on my screen as the students submitted their answers:

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As you can see, very few students got them all right. Confusion about whether or not changing a few words in a text was plagiarism or not abounded.

LESSON LEARNED:

  1. In a stubborn old school moment, I was still projecting this presentation, even though all the students could see it on their screens. If I had to do it again, I would not project my screen, as everyone could see the results of the other students. It didn’t matter so much in this context, but one of the great aspects of this kind of guerrilla formative assessment is that the students can answer honestly and discreetly.
  2. I would take some time to discuss every question before they move not o the next. The results were coming in very quickly and because my screen doesn’t give me the actual questions, I ended up not being able to understand the results on the spot. I would have gone slower in this part and talked about every question.

BEST PRACTICES:

  • Only project when necessary- remember the kids have it on their screens!
  • Get to know the software a little bit – how the quiz results look before actually using it in class. I only tried it out with one other person, which doesn’t give you the experience of having to dissect the answers of a whole class.

I am not going to show all my slides because, well, that would be boring, but here is an infographic I made last year about what makes you a plagiarist:

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Once we talked about what kinds of behaviours constituted plagiarism, I gave them an activity. We read a text about the Tasmanian Devil. Once we were finished reading it carefully (I read it aloud and the kids could follow along) I asked them to draw a mind map with the information they could remember of the text. This was a way for them to get some distance from the actual text and start thinking about it in their own words.

 

 

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The students used the “Draw it” function of Nearpod and submitted their mind maps:

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BEST PRACTICE: This worked very well, though the Draw it function is limiting and a little hard to use. But their mind maps didn’t need to be perfect for this experiment – it was only to give them an idea of how you construct one. For the purposes of this presentation it worked really well. The students also liked seeing their mind maps being shared with the group.

We looked at the information on the Tasmanian devil again. This time I asked them to write a summary of the information in their own words, once again without having the text in front of their faces:

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We shared a few answers with the group- and lo and behold, they sounded very different from the original text!

We then looked at other note-taking techniques: index cards, audio notes, columns, etc. We ended the workshop with the students pairing up and trying out the different methods of note-taking.

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Here are some screenshots of their work:

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BEST PRACTICE: I was very nervous that Nearpod wasn’t going to work, that the internet was going to be slow, that the software would crash, etc. so I made sure I had my slides loaded in my keynote on my iPad and that there was analogue solution for all the activities- I had a whole bunch of scrap paper at the ready just in case. I didn’t end up needing it, but it made me feel a lot better to have a Plan B, especially since the app crashed about two minutes before the presentation.

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All in all, I think it was a successful first attempt!

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rAPPido Review: Nearpod – an app for the 1:1 classroom

Screen Shot 2014-02-25 at 12.37.15 PMWhat is it?

Nearpod markets itself as an all in one mobile device solution for teachers. It’s motto is ” Create, engage, assess.”

I know, I know. What exactly does that mean? It means that you can upload your presentations, add interactive quizzes, polls, websites, videos, etc. Once you have uploaded your presentation, your students download the app on their devices (in our case, their iPads) and they can follow along with your presentation on their own devices.

Their is a free version as well as a subscription based paid version.

I tried it out by uploading my Traf Reads 2014 presentation.

Uploading

I could either upload content from my iPad (though it only allowed me to browse files in my camera roll, Dropbox and google drive) or I could use my desktop and simply drag and drop my files.This worked well once I figured out how to get to the screen that allowed me to crewe a new presentation- it wasn’t obvious on their default screen. But now that I have logged back in I am getting a very clear, intuitive screen that tells me exactly where to go, so maybe that was an anomaly…

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After that it was very intuitive, but BEWARE: you have to first convert your presentations into PDFs.

I also tried creating my slides from scratch on nearpod:

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I guess it would do in a pinch, but I personally like having more options.

It is also very easy to add a poll or a quiz:

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For the poll option however, you are only allowed 8 options per question. You can also ask your students to draw something for you. For example, if you have just gone through a geometry concept, you can give your students a problem and ask them to draw their answer and submit it.

Sharing with your students

This is the super easy brilliant part. The students simply need to download the free app and choose the student option:

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They are asked to join a session:

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They can then follow along with your powerpoint on their own device. Here is an image of the student iPad on the left and the teacher iPad on the right:

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The students are then asked to sign in so that the teacher can see their responses:

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This is how the quizzes look like to students:

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Nice, elegant interface!

The teacher in the meantime is collecting the results on there device:

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So far, this is the best interactive assessment tool I’ve seen. It is simple and intuitive. The downside is the fact that you can only upload PDFs. It also does not function like an interactive whiteboard like showme or explain everything, nor does there seem to be a recording feature. However, if you have an existing powerpoint you use, this is a great way to go through the slides with your class (as long as it is a 1:1 class). The ability to add assessment tools to your presentation and give them in realtime, as well as the ability to anonymously evaluate your students’ responses, is extremely interesting.

Free Vs. Upgrade

The free version allows you to do quite a bit, but it is limited. The upgrade is a subscription where you have to pay a monthly fee, one that I find a little steep.Here is a screenshot of the different upgrade options:

Screen Shot 2014-02-25 at 10.18.00 AMIn my opinion, the free version gives you enough to work with.

Nearpod is a very interesting option for delivering content in a 1:1 device classroom. Check it out!